Health

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Even if someone doesn't consider themselves a smoker, every "bummed" cigarette causes damage to vital organs in the body. Give that pancreas a break.

Source: Young, Saundra. "Surgeon General report: Tobacco smoke does immediate damage." CNN. 09 Dec. 2010. Web.
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Sodium hydroxide is a caustic compound found in hair removal products. It was found in cigarettes in 1994.

Source: "Medical Management Guidelines for Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH)." Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. 21 Oct. 2014. Web.
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Methanol is found in cigarettes. Methanol is also found in antifreeze.

Source: Perez, E. "Antifreeze Poisoning." U.S. National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 13 Jan. 2016. Web.
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Secondhand smoke causes more than 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults every single year.

Source: “Get the Facts.” Smoke-Free ATL - Everyone in ATL Has the Right to Breathe Smoke-Free Air. 2018.
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Human sweat contains urea and ammonia. Urea is added to cigarettes.

Source: Covington, and Burling. "Summary Of Data On Urea." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 17 Apr. 1986. Excerpt.
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Smoking can lead to cataracts, the number one cause of vision loss in the world.

Source: "Surgeon General's Report. The Health Conquences of Smoking." CDC. Other Effects. 777, 779. Web.
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Acetone is found in cigarette smoke. Acetone also removes nail polish.

Source: "ToxFAQs™ for Acetone." Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Atlanta, GA., Sept. 1995. Web.
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Hydrazine is found in cigarettes. Hydrazine is also found in rocket fuel.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001: 180.
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Chronic exposure to heavy metals like lead, arsenic and cadmium can affect the brain. They're all found in cigarette smoke.

Source: Tchounwou, Paul B, et al."Heavy Metals Toxicity and the Environment." PMC. 26 Aug. 2014.
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Those glowing amber charcoals used on hookahs? They release high levels of dangerous toxic agents like carbon monoxide, metals and cancer-causing chemicals.

Source: Cobb, Caroline, et al."Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: An Emerging Health Crisis in the United States." American Journal of Health Behavior. 34(3). May-June 2010: 275–285. Web.
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