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In the US, cigarettes kill about 54 people an hour.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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During Desert Storm, Big Tobacco sent Marlboro-branded merch to troops deployed in Saudi Arabia.

Source: Smith, E. A., & Malone, R. E. (2009). Tobacco Promotion to Military Personnel: “The Plums Are Here to Be Plucked.” Military Medicine, 174(8), 797–806.
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Smoking is more common among members of the US military than civilians.

Source: Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, March 30, 2017
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Big Tobacco's products kill 112 people from secondhand smoke every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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An average of 4.5mg of nicotine is absorbed from 7.9g of chewing tobacco and an average of 3.6mg of nicotine is absorbed from 2.5g moist snuff.

Source: Severson, H.H. "What Have We Learned From 20 Years of Research on Smokeless Tobacco Cessation?" American Journal of Medical Sciences. 326(4). Oct. 2003: 206-211. Web.
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From 1965-2009, there have been 103,355 tobacco-related infant deaths in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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Every day, more than 3,200 youth under age 18 try a cigarette for the first time.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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In the past, Big Tobacco has compared the addictiveness of cigarettes with that of television.

Source: "Hearing Of The House Energy & Commerce Committee Subcommittee On Health And The Environment, On Nicotine And Cigarettes." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 14 Apr. 1994. Deposition.
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In 2011, tobacco killed nearly 6 million people worldwide.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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Acetone is found in cigarette smoke. Acetone also removes nail polish.

Source: "ToxFAQs™ for Acetone." Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Atlanta, GA., Sept. 1995. Web.
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Formaldehyde is found in cigarette smoke. It's also used to preserve dead animals.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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