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NOTHIN' BUT THE COLD, HARD TRUTH.

During 2005-2009, smoking-attributable productivity losses totaled $150.7 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Pregnant women who smoke increase their risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and SIDS.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 3-86. Report.
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Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 chemicals.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Other Specific Outcomes, 2014. Report.
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Each year, nearly 6 million people around the world die from tobacco products.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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Every year, 439,000 loyal tobacco customers in the U.S. are awarded with premature death.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Big Tobacco's products kill 1,300 smokers every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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On their websites, tobacco companies encourage people to quit smoking. However, in 2006, a court found that tobacco companies manipulate nicotine levels to keep smokers addicted.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Ontervenors, v. Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 5.
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Each year only 6.2% of smokers succeed in quitting.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." CDC. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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In 1985, one tobacco company brainstormed the idea of reaching younger adult customers in record stores.

Source: "XG BRAINSTORMING NYC, 2/26." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 26 Feb. 1985. Report.
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Using smokeless tobacco is also associated with gum recession, dental caries, and dental staining and abrasion.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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