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NOTHIN' BUT THE COLD, HARD TRUTH.

Every day, about 2,100 youth and young adults become daily smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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In 2005, the vast majority of secondary school students who used smokeless tobacco were male.

Source: Eaton, D., et al. "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance --- United States, 2005." CDC. 09 June 2006. 55: 1-108. Table 26.
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Big Tobacco gave free cigarettes to psychiatric facilities.

Source: Prochaska, J. J., Hall, S. M., & Bero, L. A. (2008). Tobacco Use Among Individuals With Schizophrenia: What Role Has the Tobacco Industry Played? Schizophrenia Bulletin, 34(3), 555–567. http://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbm117
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One tobacco company brainstormed reaching its target consumer from ice cream trucks.

Source: "Other Ways to Reach the Target." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 02 Oct. 1989. Report.
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Revenues from smokeless tobacco sales totaled $2.94 billion in 2011.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2011." Federal Trade Commission. May 2013: 1. Report.
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Chemicals that seep out of cigarette butts can be acutely toxic to fish and micro-organisms.

Source: Micevska, T., et al. "Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 50(2). Feb. 2006: 205-12. Web.
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In the 90s, Big Tobacco sent free cigarettes to troops deployed overseas during Desert Storm.

Source: Smith, E. A., & Malone, R. E. (2009). “Everywhere the Soldier Will Be”: Wartime Tobacco Promotion in the US Military. American Journal of Public Health, 99(9), 1595–1602. http://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2008.152983
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In the US, smoking-attributable productivity losses for men are approximately $105.6 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Advertising products at the point-of-sale at convenience stores increases "impulse buys" and makes tobacco seem like a part of everyday life. Which is probably why Big Tobacco spends 95% of its $9.1 billion yearly budget here. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape. St. Louis, MO: Center for Public Health Systems Science at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Cancer Institute, State and Community Tobacco Control Research Initative, 2014. http://publichealthlawcenter.org/sites/default /files/resources/WaU-guide-POS-policy-report-2015.pdf
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Using smokeless tobacco is also associated with gum recession, dental caries, and dental staining and abrasion.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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Erase & Replace

SMOKING IN YOUR PROFILE PICS? REPLACE THAT CIG WITH SOMETHING A LITTLE MORE INSPIRING.