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NOTHIN' BUT THE COLD, HARD TRUTH.

In 2008, more than 48 million Americans had successfully quit smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults and Trends in Smoking Cessation- United States, 2008." CDC. 13 Nov. 2009: 58(44).
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34.1% of middle school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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Every day, more than 3,200 youth under age 18 try a cigarette for the first time.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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In 1984, a tobacco company called younger adult smokers "replacement smokers."

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids. 14 May 2001: 2.
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Cigarette companies spend almost ALL their marketing budget on discounting cigarettes. 

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report of 2014." Federal Trade Commission, 2016.
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Advertising products at the point-of-sale at convenience stores increases "impulse buys" and makes tobacco seem like a part of everyday life. Which is probably why Big Tobacco spends 95% of its $9.1 billion yearly budget here. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape. St. Louis, MO: Center for Public Health Systems Science at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Cancer Institute, State and Community Tobacco Control Research Initative, 2014. http://publichealthlawcenter.org/sites/default /files/resources/WaU-guide-POS-policy-report-2015.pdf
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Tobacco products are the only legal consumer product that can kill people when used as intended.

Source: "Tobacco Free Initiative (TFI). WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008 - The MPOWER package." World Health Organization. 2009: 15. Web.
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In the US, 130,659 people die each year from smoking-related lung cancer.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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During Desert Storm, Big Tobacco sent Marlboro-branded merch to troops deployed in Saudi Arabia.

Source: Smith, E. A., & Malone, R. E. (2009). Tobacco Promotion to Military Personnel: “The Plums Are Here to Be Plucked.” Military Medicine, 174(8), 797–806.
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Formaldehyde is found in cigarette smoke. It's also used to preserve dead animals.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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In 2010, 52.4% of U.S. smokers quit for at least a day.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." CDC. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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112 people die from secondhand smoke everyday. That's 112 too many.