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NOTHIN' BUT THE COLD, HARD TRUTH.

The overwhelming majority of smokers72%—either earn lower wages, lack health insurance and/or have less education.

Source: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Volume 28, Number 1, February 2017, pp. 100-107 (Article)
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Around 375,000 stores in the U.S. sell tobacco products. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape, 2014.
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Big Tobacco targeted people in the U.S. military.

Source: Tobacco Promotion to Military Personnel: “The Plums Are Here to Be Plucked.”
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In the U.S., 33,951 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related heart disease.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Tobacco accounts for one out of every ten deaths worldwide and claims nearly 6 million lives each year.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 6 July 2015. Web.
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The amount the industry spent on tobacco advertising and promotion in 2012? $26 million per day.

Source: "Cigarette Sales Declined, Smokeless Tobacco Sales Increased From 2011 Levels." Federal Trade Commission. 27 March 2015. Web.
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There is no level or amount of exposure to secondhand smoke that is “risk-free.”

Source: “Smokefree Policies Improve Health.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 Dec. 2016,
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In 2012, every 25 minutes, a baby was born suffering from opioid withdrawal.

Source: Patrick SW, Davis MM, Lehmann CU, Cooper WO. Increasing incidence and geographic distribution of neonatal abstinence syndrome: United States 2009 to 2012 [published correction appears in J Perinatol. 2015 Aug;35(8):667. Lehman, C U [corrected to Lehmann, C U]]. J Perinatol. 2015;35(8):650–655. doi:10.1038/jp.2015.36
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A study in DC just three years ago found that little cigars and cigarillos were cheaper in neighborhoods with a higher density of black residents. 

Source: American Journal of Public Health : Peer Reviewed. "Marketing Little Cigars and Cigarillos: Advertising, Price, and Associations With Neighborhood Demographics" ; Jennifer Cantrell, DrPH, MPA, Jennifer M. Kreslake, MPH, Ollie Ganz, MSPH, Jennifer L. Pearson, PhD, MPH, Donna Vallone, PhD, MPH, Andrew Anesetti-Rothermel, MPH, Haijun Xiao, MS, and Thomas R. Kirchner, PhD ; October 2013, Vol 103, No. 10
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Exploited

Big Tobacco has been targeting low-income neighborhoods for decades. They’re still up to it.