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Since 1999, over 9,000 children and teens have died from opioid overdoses.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC WONDER: Multiple Cause of Death 1999-2017.
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Cigarette smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cancer, 2014: 9. Report.
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Since 1964, there have been more than 20 million premature deaths attributed to tobacco in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General Executive Summary." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Florida recorded its lowest teen smoking rate ever in 2016, 5.2%!

Source: Florida Health. (2017). Celebrating 10 Successful Years [Fact sheet]. Retrieved from http://tobaccofreeflorida.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/TFF10Years.pdf
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In the U.S., 160,000 people die each year from smoking-related lung cancer.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
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Dogs and cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes.

Source: Reif, John, Christa Bruns, and Kimberly Lower. “Cancer of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Pet Dogs.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 147(5). 1998. Web.
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In the US, smoking-attributable productivity losses for men are approximately $105.6 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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1,893 U.S. smokers died in 2008 from smoking-related atherosclerosis.

Source: "Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses-- United States, 2000-2004." CDC. 14 Nov. 57(45). 2008: 1226-8. Table.
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The majority of smokers begin before the age of 18 (nearly 87% before age 18, and nearly 94% before age 20).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Tobacco accounts for one out of every ten deaths worldwide and claims nearly 6 million lives each year.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 6 July 2015. Web.
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