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2-Naphthylamine, 4-Aminobiphenyl, Benzene, Vinyl Chloride, Ethylene Oxide, Arsenic, Beryllium, Nickel, Chromium (only hexavalent), Cadmium, and Polonium-210 are human carcinogens found in tobacco smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 176-80.
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Cigarettes aren’t biodegradable — which means they don’t fully break down over time.

Source: "The Environment vs Cigarettes." Quit Smoking Community. 27 Nov. 2013.
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Nicotine reaches the brain 10-20 seconds after smoke is inhaled.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Nicotine, 2014. Report.
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Even brief contact with secondhand smoke can cause harm.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.
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Some kids exposed to secondhand smoke have more body fat and slower learning skills.

Source: "Second-hand Smoke Increases Fatness, Hinders Cognition in Children." Medical Xpress. 28 Jan. 2016.
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Because of something called the ‘smoking wage gap,’ young smokers could miss out on up to $10,000 a year.

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Usual Weekly Earnings Of Wage And Salary Workers Second Quarter 2016.19 July 2016.
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In an average one-hour hookah session, you inhale 100 to 200 times as much smoke as from a single cigarette.

Source: "Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: Health Effects, Research Needs and Recommended Actions by Regulators. WHO Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation (TobReg)." World Health Organization. Geneva, Switzerland. 16 Sept. 2005.
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There were 100 million deaths worldwide from tobacco use in the 20th century.

Source: "Smoking’s Death Toll." The Tobacco Atlas. 2015. Web.
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Exposure to pro-tobacco movies, TV shows, and ads more than doubles your chances of starting smoking.

Source: Wellman, Robert J., et al. "The Extent to Which Tobacco Marketing and Tobacco Use in Films Contribute to Children's Use of Tobacco: A Meta-analysis." Archive of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Jan. 2007.
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Tobacco accounts for one out of every ten deaths worldwide and claims nearly 6 million lives each year.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 6 July 2015. Web.
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