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NOTHIN' BUT THE COLD, HARD TRUTH.

Revenues from smokeless tobacco sales totaled $4.20 billion in 2017.

Source: Federal Trade Commission. Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2017. Retrieved from https://www.ftc.gov/reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2017-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco. Published February, 2019.
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Florida recorded its lowest teen smoking rate ever in 2016, 5.2%!

Source: Florida Health. (2017). Celebrating 10 Successful Years [Fact sheet]. Retrieved from http://tobaccofreeflorida.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/TFF10Years.pdf
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The number of tobacco farms in the U.S. has gone from 415,315 in 1959 to 10,014 today.

Source: "Tobacco-Farms and Acres, by Acres Harvested, Quantity Harvested, and Value of Crop for Tobacco, for Selected States: 1964 and 1959." U.S. Department of Agriculture. Table 59.
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Low-income neighborhoods are more likely to have tobacco retailers near schools than other neighborhoods

Source: D’Angelo, Heather, Alice Ammerman, Penny Gordon-Larsen, Laura Linnan, Leslie Lytle, and Kurt M. Ribisl. "Sociodemographic Disparities in Proximity of Schools to Tobacco Outlets and Fast-Food Restaurants." American Journal of Public Health 106.9 (2016): 1556-562.
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Big Tobacco's products affect the readiness and performance of the military.

Source: Combating Tobacco Use in Military and Veteran Populations, 2009
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Cigarette smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cancer, 2014: 9. Report.
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A study conducted in Philadelphia found that there were 69% more tobacco retailers per capita in low-income areas than in high-income areas.

Source: Philadelphia Department of Public Health. Tobacco Sales and Neighborhood Income in Philadelphia. CHART 2016;1(2):1–6
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Big Tobacco's products kill 1,300 smokers every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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