Pets

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Fish can be unintentionally killed if their owner smokes. Gulp.

Source: Axelrod, Herbert R. et al. Dr. Axelrod’s Mini-Atlas of Freshwater Aquarium Fish. 1987 p. 827.
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There is no level or amount of exposure to secondhand smoke that is “risk-free.”

Source: “Smokefree Policies Improve Health.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 Dec. 2016,
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Methane is found in dog poop and in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001.
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Cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes. The toxins from cigarettes are inhaled and get on their fur—which is licked up when cats groom themselves. 

Source: Bertone, Elizabeth, Laura Snyder, and Antony Moore. “Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Pet Cats.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(3). 2002. Web.
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Formaldehyde is found in cigarette smoke. It's also used to preserve dead animals.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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There's hydrogen cyanide in rat poison. The same stuff is in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, 19 Nov. 2001. 56, 176, 251.
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69 animal and/or human carcinogens are in tobacco smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001.
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Chemicals that seep out of cigarette butts can be acutely toxic to fish and micro-organisms.

Source: Micevska, T., et al. "Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 50(2). Feb. 2006: 205-12. Web.
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Nicotine has been found in the breast milk of animals exposed to tobacco.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 564. Report.
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Fluffy cuddly bunnies, they are more likely to have heart problems if their owner smokes.

Source: "Surgeon General, The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2006)"
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Cinnamaldehyde is found in cigarettes. Cinnamaldehyde is also found in pet repellant.

Source: "PM USA Cigarette Tobacco & Flavor Ingredients." Altria. 1. Web.
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Back in the day, Big tobacco exposed sheep to smoke by sticking tracheotomy tubes down their throats.

Source: "Exposure of Sheep to Smoke by way of a Tracheostomy Tube." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. Oct. 1970. Chart, Graph.
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