Pets

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Cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes. The toxins from cigarettes are inhaled and get on their fur—which is licked up when cats groom themselves. 

Source: Bertone, Elizabeth, Laura Snyder, and Antony Moore. “Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Pet Cats.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(3). 2002. Web.
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Fluffy cuddly bunnies, they are more likely to have heart problems if their owner smokes.

Source: "Surgeon General, The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2006)"
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Dogs and cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes.

Source: Reif, John, Christa Bruns, and Kimberly Lower. “Cancer of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Pet Dogs.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 147(5). 1998. Web.
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Second hand smoke has been associated with lung cancer in birds. Not much to chirp about here.

Source: Oklahoma State University. "Secondhand Smoke Is A Health Threat To Pets." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2007.
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Fish can be unintentionally killed if their owner smokes. Gulp.

Source: Axelrod, Herbert R. et al. Dr. Axelrod’s Mini-Atlas of Freshwater Aquarium Fish. 1987 p. 827.
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