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People with mental illness die about 5 years earlier than those without these disorders; many of these deaths are caused by smoking cigarettes.

Source: Tobacco Use Among Adults with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders (Secondary Source CDC Report) ; March 10, 2017
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Toluene is found in cigarette smoke. Toluene is also found in gasoline.

Source: McKeown, N J. "Toluene Toxicity." Medscape, 01 Feb. 2015. Web.
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Big Tobacco has been ordered to say they were deliberately deceptive when they designed cigarettes to jack up the impact of nicotine.

Source: "United States of America v. Phillip Morris USA, Inc." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 27 Nov. 2012. Document.
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Benzene, arsenic and cyanide are all poisons. They're all in cigarette smoke too.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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There are 11 known human carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. Oct. 2001.
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Menthol cigarettes are easier to start and harder to quit.

Source: Truth Initiative, October 12, 2016.
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Carbon monoxide is in tobacco smoke. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas which can cause death.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 185.
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Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 chemicals.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Other Specific Outcomes, 2014. Report.
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Because nicotine from smokeless tobacco is absorbed through the mouth, it takes longer to produce an effect than if it were absorbed through the lungs. But using cigarettes and smokeless tobacco really do result in the same amount of nicotine intake.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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Chronic exposure to heavy metals like lead, arsenic and cadmium can affect the brain. They're all found in cigarette smoke.

Source: Tchounwou, Paul B, et al."Heavy Metals Toxicity and the Environment." PMC. 26 Aug. 2014.
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Toluene is found in cigarette smoke. Toluene is also found in explosives.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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