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Hydrogen cyanide has been used in prison executions. It's also found in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, 19 Nov. 2001. 56, 176, 251.
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Chemicals that seep out of cigarette butts can be acutely toxic to fish and micro-organisms.

Source: Micevska, T., et al. "Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 50(2). Feb. 2006: 205-12. Web.
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Because nicotine from smokeless tobacco is absorbed through the mouth, it takes longer to produce an effect than if it were absorbed through the lungs. But using cigarettes and smokeless tobacco really do result in the same amount of nicotine intake.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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Nicotine is in tobacco smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 178.
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One cigarette company biologically engineered tobacco plants to have twice the normal level of nicotine.

Source: "A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Other Effects. 2004: 616. Report.
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E-cigarette aerosol can contain toxic metals

Source: National Academies of Sciences E, Medicine. Public Health Consequences of E-Cigarettes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2018.
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Benzene, arsenic and cyanide are all poisons. They're all in cigarette smoke too.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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People with any mental health issues or substance abuse disorders account for 40% of the cigarettes smoked in the U.S.

Source: Source: 2009 to 2011 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUHs). NSDUH is an annual survey sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
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Cinnamaldehyde is found in cigarettes. Cinnamaldehyde is also found in pet repellant.

Source: "PM USA Cigarette Tobacco & Flavor Ingredients." Altria. 1. Web.
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Nicotine reaches the brain 10-20 seconds after smoke is inhaled.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Nicotine, 2014. Report.
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E-cigarettes have had some quality-control issues. Plus, most e-cigs contain addictive nicotine, and carcinogens have been found in some e-cig vapor. How about we get some more research and regulation up in here?

Source: Cobb, Nathan K., et al. "Novel Nicotine Delivery Systems and Public Health: The Rise of the “E-Cigarette"." American Journal of Public Health. 100(12). Dec. 2010: 2340–2342. Web.
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