Ingredients

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One cigarette company biologically engineered tobacco plants to have twice the normal level of nicotine.

Source: "A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Other Effects. 2004: 616. Report.
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Cinnamaldehyde is found in cigarettes. Cinnamaldehyde is also found in pet repellant.

Source: "PM USA Cigarette Tobacco & Flavor Ingredients." Altria. 1. Web.
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People with mental illness die about 5 years earlier than those without these disorders; many of these deaths are caused by smoking cigarettes.

Source: Tobacco Use Among Adults with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders (Secondary Source CDC Report) ; March 10, 2017
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There's hydrogen cyanide in rat poison. The same stuff is in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, 19 Nov. 2001. 56, 176, 251.
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Chromium is in tobacco smoke. Chromium contributes to cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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Ammonia boosts the impact of nicotine.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 174.
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Geraniol is found in cigarettes. Geraniol is also found in pesticides.

Source: "PM USA Cigarette Tobacco & Flavor Ingredients." Altria. 2. Web.
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Radioactive Polonium-210 is found in cigarette smoke. Polonium-210 contributes to cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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Methanol is found in cigarettes. Methanol is also found in antifreeze.

Source: Perez, E. "Antifreeze Poisoning." U.S. National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 13 Jan. 2016. Web.
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Some studies have found vapes to contain lead, nickel, tin, silver, formaldehyde, manganese, toluene, and other chemicals linked to cancer and central nervous system problems.

Source: Williams, M., Villarreal, A., Bozhilov, K., Lin, S., & Talbot, P. (n.d.). Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23526962
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Propylene glycol can become formaldehyde — a carcinogen — when heated to vaping temperatures.

Source: Salamanca, J. C., Meehan-Atrash, J., Vreeke, S., Escobedo, J. O., Peyton, D. H., & Strongin, R. M. (2018). E-cigarettes can emit formaldehyde at high levels under conditions that have been reported to be non-averse to users. Scientific reports, 8(1), 7559. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-25907-6
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