Ingredients

Showing 67 Results

Nicotine is addictive.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction: A Report of the Surgeon General." National Library of Medicine. Center for Health Promotion and Education. Office on Smoking and Health. 1988. Web.
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Chronic exposure to heavy metals like lead, arsenic and cadmium can affect the brain. They're all found in cigarette smoke.

Source: Tchounwou, Paul B, et al."Heavy Metals Toxicity and the Environment." PMC. 26 Aug. 2014.
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In 1972, a tobacco company considered adding honey to cigarettes because teenagers like sweet products.

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Washington, DC. 14 May 2001. 3. Web.
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Cadmium is found in cigarettes. Cadmium is also found in batteries.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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Propylene glycol can become formaldehyde — a carcinogen — when heated to vaping temperatures.

Source: Salamanca, J. C., Meehan-Atrash, J., Vreeke, S., Escobedo, J. O., Peyton, D. H., & Strongin, R. M. (2018). E-cigarettes can emit formaldehyde at high levels under conditions that have been reported to be non-averse to users. Scientific reports, 8(1), 7559. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-25907-6
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Human sweat contains urea and ammonia. Urea is added to cigarettes.

Source: Covington, and Burling. "Summary Of Data On Urea." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 17 Apr. 1986. Excerpt.
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Carbon monoxide is in tobacco smoke. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas which can cause death.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 185.
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Benzene, arsenic and cyanide are all poisons. They're all in cigarette smoke too.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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People with any mental health issues or substance abuse disorders account for 40% of the cigarettes smoked in the U.S.

Source: Source: 2009 to 2011 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUHs). NSDUH is an annual survey sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
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Toluene is found in cigarette smoke. Toluene is also found in gasoline.

Source: McKeown, N J. "Toluene Toxicity." Medscape, 01 Feb. 2015. Web.
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