Cancer

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Some studies have found vapes to contain lead, nickel, tin, silver, formaldehyde, manganese, toluene, and other chemicals linked to cancer and central nervous system problems.

Source: Williams, M., Villarreal, A., Bozhilov, K., Lin, S., & Talbot, P. (n.d.). Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23526962
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There are 11 known human carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. Oct. 2001.
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About 90% of lung cancer deaths among women who continue to smoke are tobacco related.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2001. 13. Report.
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Secondhand smoke contains 7,000 chemicals, many of which are toxic and can cause cancer.

Source: Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, July 2015.
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Of current smokers in the U.S., 358,000 have a cancer other than lung cancer from smoking.

Source: Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000. CDC. 04 Sept. 2003; 52(35) 842-844. Table.
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82.4% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Cigarette smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cancer, 2014: 9. Report.
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Hookah smoke has been associated with oral, lung and bladder cancer, not to mention clogged arteries and heart disease.

Source: Cobb, Caroline, et al."Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: An Emerging Health Crisis in the United States." American Journal of Health Behavior. 34(3). May-June 2010: 275–285. Web.
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In the U.S., 160,000 people die each year from smoking-related lung cancer.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
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Cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes. The toxins from cigarettes are inhaled and get on their fur—which is licked up when cats groom themselves. 

Source: Bertone, Elizabeth, Laura Snyder, and Antony Moore. “Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Pet Cats.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(3). 2002. Web.
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Chromium is in tobacco smoke. Chromium contributes to cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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Smokeless tobacco increases the risk of oral cancer.

Source: "Summaries and Evaluations Tobacco Products, Smokeless (Group 1)." International Agency for Research on Cancer. 10 Feb. 1998. Web.
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