Cancer

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Because of the tobacco industry's products, about 353 people in the U.S. die of lung cancer every day.

Source: "Tobacco Use. Targeting The Nations Leading Killer: At A Glance 2010." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Atlanta, GA: 2. Web.
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Long-term smokeless tobacco users may be up to fifty times more likely to have cancers of the cheek and gum than non-users.

Source: "Cancer Facts & Figures 2015." American Cancer Society. Atlanta, GA. 2015: 48. Web.
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Cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes. The toxins from cigarettes are inhaled and get on their fur—which is licked up when cats groom themselves. 

Source: Bertone, Elizabeth, Laura Snyder, and Antony Moore. “Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Pet Cats.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(3). 2002. Web.
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Radioactive Polonium-210 is found in cigarette smoke. Polonium-210 contributes to cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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In a file from 1978, Big Tobacco described cancer as "an essential ingredient of life." Wait, they're talking about cancer, right?

Source: "A Public Relations Strategy for the Tobacco Advisory Council Appraisal & Proposals Prepared by Campbell-Johnson Ltd." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 20 Nov. 1978. Report.
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 138,000 have lung cancer from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003. 52(35): 842-844. Table.
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In the US, 36,000 people die each year from cancers other than lung caused by smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Second hand smoke has been associated with lung cancer in birds. Not much to chirp about here.

Source: Oklahoma State University. "Secondhand Smoke Is A Health Threat To Pets." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2007.
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Cigarette smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cancer, 2014: 9. Report.
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Of current smokers in the U.S., 358,000 have a cancer other than lung cancer from smoking.

Source: Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000. CDC. 04 Sept. 2003; 52(35) 842-844. Table.
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The most common causes of death among people with mental illness are heart disease, cancer, and lung disease, which can all be caused by smoking.

Source: Tobacco Use Among Adults with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders (Secondary Source CDC Report)
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Smokeless tobacco use causes oral cancer, lesions, and gum recession.

Source: Nelson, D.E., et al. "Trends in Smokeless Tobacco Use Among Adults and Adolescents in the United States." American Journal of Public Health. 96(5). May 2006: 897–905.
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