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NOTHIN' BUT THE COLD, HARD TRUTH.

Big Tobacco's products kill 1,300 smokers every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Of current smokers in the U.S., 46,000 have lung cancer from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 52(35). 2003: 842-844. Table.
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Cinnamaldehyde is found in cigarettes. Cinnamaldehyde is also found in pet repellant.

Source: "PM USA Cigarette Tobacco & Flavor Ingredients." Altria. 1. Web.
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In the past, Big Tobacco has compared the addictiveness of cigarettes with M&M's.

Source: "The State of Minnesota By Hubert H. Humphrey, III, Its Attorney General, vs. Philip Morris Incorporated. Deposition of Calude E. Teague, Jr. With Exhibits 1088-1100 Plus Exhibit A." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 08 Jul. 1997. Deposition.
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Big Tobacco's products kill 112 people from secondhand smoke every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Cigarette companies increased its spending on advertisements and promotions from 8.05 billion in 2010 to 8.37 billion in 2011.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2011." Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission. 2013. Report.
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Even brief contact with secondhand smoke can cause harm.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.
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There's hydrogen cyanide in rat poison. The same stuff is in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, 19 Nov. 2001. 56, 176, 251.
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In an average one-hour hookah session, you inhale 100 to 200 times as much smoke as from a single cigarette.

Source: "Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: Health Effects, Research Needs and Recommended Actions by Regulators. WHO Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation (TobReg)." World Health Organization. Geneva, Switzerland. 16 Sept. 2005.
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Opioid painkillers like Vicodin® and OxyContin® are chemically similar to heroin.

Source: NIDA. Opioids. National Institute on Drug Abuse website. https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids. . Accessed May 11, 2018.
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In 1972, a tobacco company considered adding honey to cigarettes because teenagers like sweet products.

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Washington, DC. 14 May 2001. 3. Web.
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