Why!?

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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,872,000 have chronic bronchitis from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000." CDC. MMWR 2003; 52(35) 842-844. Table.
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In 1985, one tobacco vice president wondered, in reference to smoking-related deaths, if we should ban sleep since according to him the majority of people die in their sleep.

Source: Dollisson, J. "Smoking & Health 'The Scientific Controversy'." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 14 May 1985. 109-13. Report.
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Around 375,000 stores in the U.S. sell tobacco products. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape, 2014.
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Second hand smoke has been associated with lung cancer in birds. Not much to chirp about here.

Source: Oklahoma State University. "Secondhand Smoke Is A Health Threat To Pets." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2007.
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E-cigarette aerosol can contain toxic metals

Source: National Academies of Sciences E, Medicine. Public Health Consequences of E-Cigarettes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2018.
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Hydrogen cyanide is in tobacco smoke. Hydrogen cyanide exposure causes cardiovascular and respiratory illness.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001.
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Acetaldehyde is in tobacco smoke. Acetaldehyde is a hazardous air pollutant.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 179.
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In 2005, the vast majority of secondary school students who used smokeless tobacco were male.

Source: Eaton, D., et al. "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance --- United States, 2005." CDC. 09 June 2006. 55: 1-108. Table 26.
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One tree is killed for just 15 packs of Cigarettes.

Source: "Billions of trees. Millions of cigarette butts. One dangerous product." California Department of Public Health. 2015. Web.
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One cigarette company biologically engineered tobacco plants to have twice the normal level of nicotine.

Source: "A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Other Effects. 2004: 616. Report.
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It is estimated that as many as 15.9% of pregnant women and girls smoke.

Source: "Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings." Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Sept. 2013. 47. Figure 4.5.
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82.4% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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