Why!?

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Smoking causes impaired lung growth during childhood and adolescence.

Source: "The 2004 Surgeon General's Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking. What It Means To You." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004. 27-36. Report.
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Pregnant women who smoke increase their risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and SIDS.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 3-86. Report.
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In 2007, Camel sold pink and teal-packaged cigarettes which attracted young girls.

Source: Pierce, JP, et al. "Camel No. 9 cigarette-marketing campaign targeted young teenage girls." Pediatrics. Apr. 2010. 125(4): 619-26. Web.
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620 people die each year in the U.S. from smoking-related fires.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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In the US, 36,000 people die each year from cancers other than lung caused by smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,755,000 have had a heart attack from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003. 52(35): 842-844. Table.
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Tobacco companies have been targeting women with their advertising for the last 80 years.

Source: "Women and Smoking: Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. Factors Influencing Tobacco Use Among Women, 2001. 44, 96. Report.
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In 2001, 12-14 year olds were more likely to report having seen smoking on TV and movies than were 18-24 year olds.

Source: "Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2012." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 2012. Report.
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Tobacco companies actually went to court to fight for the right to keep tobacco advertising near high schools. They won. Congrats, Big Tobacco!

Source: "Lorillard Tobacco Co., et al., Petitioners v. Thomas F. Reilly, Attorney General of Massachusetts; Altadis U.S.A. Inc., et al., Petitioners v. Thomas F. Reilly, Attorney General of Massachuetts." Supreme Court of the United States. 00-596, 00-597. 2000. Court Brief.
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In the U.S., 33,951 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related heart disease.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Back in the day, tobacco documents included a segmentation of the women's market into groups like "emotional bra burning extremists" and "blatant lesbians."

Source: Satterthwaite, F.B. "Segmenting the Women's Market by Women's Role, Women's Lib and Other Social Forces #7591." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 18 June 1973. Report.
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Revenues from smokeless tobacco sales totaled $2.94 billion in 2011.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2011." Federal Trade Commission. May 2013: 1. Report.
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