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Street artists create art and get arrested. Tobacco companies make products that kill people and walk away scot-free. Little backwards, huh?

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In 1985, a tobacco industry brainstorming session came up with the idea of reaching their "younger adult smokers" in candy stores.

Source: "XG Brainstorming." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 26 Feb. 1985: 1-40. Report.
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Tobacco products are the only legal consumer product that can kill people when used as intended.

Source: "Tobacco Free Initiative (TFI). WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008 - The MPOWER package." World Health Organization. 2009: 15. Web.
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One tobacco company brainstormed reaching its target consumer from ice cream trucks.

Source: "Other Ways to Reach the Target." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 02 Oct. 1989. Report.
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In the US, cigarettes kill about 54 people an hour.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Big Tobacco disproportionately targeted the LGBTQ community. They even used “pride” in their advertisements. 

Source: "How the Tobacco Industry Has Targeted the LGBT Community for Decades." ATTN.com; 13 Jan 2017.
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As late as 1999, tobacco companies placed in-store advertising signage at a child's eye level.

Source: "Point-of-Purchase Tobacco Environments and Variation by Store Type --- United States, 1999." CDC. 08 March 2002. 51(09): 184-7. Web.
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Smokers earn 20% less than non-smokers.

Source: Hotchkiss, Julie L., and Melinda Pitts. "Even One Is Too Much: The Economic Consequences of Being a Smoker." Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, July 2013.
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy increases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Around the 1980s, tobacco companies labeled African Americans - less educated, prefer malt liquor, have problems with their own self-esteem.

Source: "1990 (900000) New Marketing Ideas. Summary of Programs." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 1989. Report.
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In the US, 21% of middle school and 16% of high school students who smoke, smoke Newport, a predominantly menthol brand.

Source: Perks SN, Armour B, Agaku IT. Cigarette Brand Preference and Pro-Tobacco Advertising Among Middle and High School Students — United States, 2012–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2 Feb 2018;67:119–124.
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