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Advertising products at the point-of-sale at convenience stores increases "impulse buys" and makes tobacco seem like a part of everyday life. Which is probably why Big Tobacco spends 95% of its $9.1 billion yearly budget here. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape. St. Louis, MO: Center for Public Health Systems Science at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Cancer Institute, State and Community Tobacco Control Research Initative, 2014. http://publichealthlawcenter.org/sites/default /files/resources/WaU-guide-POS-policy-report-2015.pdf
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Unlike other products, the tobacco industry doesn't need to list ingredients on the label.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 175.
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The tobacco industry spends $26 million each day marketing its products in the U.S. alone.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2012." Federal Trade Commission. 2015.
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In the past, Big Tobacco has compared the addictiveness of cigarettes with coffee.

Source: "Hearing Of The House Energy & Commerce Committee Subcommittee On Health And The Environment, On Nicotine And Cigarettes." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 14 Apr. 1994. Deposition.
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Urea was found in cigarettes. Urea is also found in Pee.

Source: Covington & Burling. "Summary of Data on Urea." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 05 Feb. 1993. Report.
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Tobacco kills about 30 times more people than murder.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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African-Americans are more likely to die from smoking-related diseases than whites, even though they smoke fewer cigarettes and make more quit attempts.

Source: "African Americans and Tobacco Use." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 01 Mar. 2017.
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Carbon monoxide is in tobacco smoke. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas which can cause death.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 185.
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Acetone is found in cigarette smoke. Acetone also removes nail polish.

Source: "ToxFAQs™ for Acetone." Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Atlanta, GA., Sept. 1995. Web.
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About one third of youth smokers will eventually die from a tobacco-related disease.

Source: Epstein, D. "Tobacco: the next World War?" Pan American Health Organization. World Health Organization. 1997. 2(2). Web.
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Every year, 27 million pounds of pesticides are used to grow tobacco.

Source: "Fact Sheet: Environmental Impact of Tobacco." Multnomah County Health Department. March 2013. Web.
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