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Showing 215 Results

Smokers earn 20% less than non-smokers.

Source: Hotchkiss, Julie L., and Melinda Pitts. "Even One Is Too Much: The Economic Consequences of Being a Smoker." Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, July 2013.
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Street artists create art and get arrested. Tobacco companies make products that kill people and walk away scot-free. Little backwards, huh?

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Smokeless tobacco increases the risk of oral cancer.

Source: "Summaries and Evaluations Tobacco Products, Smokeless (Group 1)." International Agency for Research on Cancer. 10 Feb. 1998. Web.
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One study found that half of people who try cigarettes in college still smoke 4 years later.

Source: Wetter, David W., et al. "Prevalence and Predictors of Transitions in Smoking Behavior Among College Students." American Psychological Association. 2004. 23(2): 168–177. Article.
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Every year, 27 million pounds of pesticides are used to grow tobacco.

Source: "Fact Sheet: Environmental Impact of Tobacco." Multnomah County Health Department. March 2013. Web.
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In 1984, a tobacco company called younger adult smokers "replacement smokers."

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids. 14 May 2001: 2.
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Nicotine is as addictive as heroin, cocaine and alcohol.

Source: "International Symposium on Nicotine: The Effects of Nicotine on Biological Systems II." Google Books. Ed. Clarke, P.B.S., et al., 1994. Web.
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Every year, 47,000 African-Americans die of smoking-related illnesses

Source: Robinson RG, Sutton CD, James DA, Orleans CT. Pathways to Freedom: Winning the Fight Against Tobacco. U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2004.
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Hydrogen cyanide has been used in prison executions. It's also found in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, 19 Nov. 2001. 56, 176, 251.
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