Nope.

Showing 55 Results

LGBTQ young adults are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco.

Source: "This Free Life Campaign." FDA. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 2 May 2016.
30
Reactions

In the 50’s, Big Tobacco went into low-income neighborhoods and housing projects to hand out free cigarettes. Some went to children as young as 9 years old.

Source: WILLIE EVANS v. LORILLARD TOBACCO COMPANY. Superior Court of Massachusetts, County. WILLIE EVANS, as Executor of the Estate of Marie R. Evans, Plaintiff v. LORILLARD TOBACCO COMPANY, Defendant ; CIVIL ACTION NO: 2004–2840–B ; September 01, 2011
290
Reactions

Most cigarette filters are made of plastic, not cotton (like your shirt)

Source: Fundamental Research Centre,Luke, JA. Degradability of Filter Materials and Plastics Packaging. 1991 September 20. British American Tobacco.
76
Reactions

In the past, Big Tobacco called African Americans a ‘Market Priority’.

Source: Special Market Analysis: Black, Hispanic, Military. Rep. no. Jhbf0092. Industry Documents Library.
226
Reactions

In 2007, Camel sold pink and teal packaged cigarettes which attracted young girls.

Source: "Camel No. 9 Cigarette-Marketing Campaign Targeted Young Teenage Girls." American Academy of Pediatrics, 10 November 2009
206
Reactions

Smokers earn 20% less than non-smokers.

Source: Hotchkiss, Julie L., and Melinda Pitts. "Even One Is Too Much: The Economic Consequences of Being a Smoker." Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, July 2013.
188
Reactions

Nearly 95% of regular smokers start by the age of 21.

Source: The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (US) Office on Smoking and Health. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US); 2014.
21
Reactions

Fact: 81% of youth who have ever used tobacco started with a flavored product.

Source: "Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults: Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014)." American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 2017.
21
Reactions

During 2005-2009, smoking-attributable productivity losses totaled $150.7 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
29
Reactions

Smoking is more common among members of the US military than civilians.

Source: Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, March 30, 2017
24
Reactions