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Every day, cows release methane gas into the air. From you know where. But methane is also found somewhere else. Yesiree, in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, 19 Nov. 2001. Report.
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There were 100 million deaths worldwide from tobacco use in the 20th century.

Source: "Smoking’s Death Toll." The Tobacco Atlas. 2015. Web.
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Every 6 seconds, someone in the world dies from a smoking-related disease.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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Fact: 81% of youth who have ever used tobacco started with a flavored product.

Source: "Flavored Tobacco Product Use in Youth and Adults: Findings From the First Wave of the PATH Study (2013–2014)." American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 2017.
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In the US, smoking-attributable productivity losses for men are approximately $105.6 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Even if someone doesn't consider themselves a smoker, every "bummed" cigarette causes damage to vital organs in the body. Give that pancreas a break.

Source: Young, Saundra. "Surgeon General report: Tobacco smoke does immediate damage." CNN. 09 Dec. 2010. Web.
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Cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes. The toxins from cigarettes are inhaled and get on their fur—which is licked up when cats groom themselves. 

Source: Bertone, Elizabeth, Laura Snyder, and Antony Moore. “Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Pet Cats.” American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(3). 2002. Web.
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Benzene is in tobacco smoke. Benzene causes cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 176.
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In the past, Big Tobacco described some low-income consumers as "very repressed," having "low self-esteem" and "an overall pessimistic outlook on life."

Source: Author: G.P. Ward, an employee of Brown and Williamson (as indicated by the headline “internal correspondence”
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In the US, 21% of middle school and 16% of high school students who smoke, smoke Newport, a predominantly menthol brand.

Source: Perks SN, Armour B, Agaku IT. Cigarette Brand Preference and Pro-Tobacco Advertising Among Middle and High School Students — United States, 2012–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2 Feb 2018;67:119–124.
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Ammonia is in tobacco smoke. It's also used to clean toilets.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 178.
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As early as 1998, execs from one major tobacco company discussed "covertly" contacting graffiti artists to paint for them in key locations.

Source: "Salem: Recommendations to "Plus" New York Test." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 13 Aug. 1998. Report.
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