Gahh!

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Back in the day, tobacco companies provided the White House with complimentary gold-sealed "Presidential" cigarettes. Way to hail the chief.

Source: Bull, Stephen B. "Presidential Cigarettes." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 13 Apr. 1988. Memo.
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Half of people who try cigs in college still smoke four years later.

Source: Wetter, David W., et al. "Prevalence and Predictors of Transitions in Smoking Behavior Among College Students." American Psychological Association. 2004. 23(2): 168–177. Article.
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People with serious mental illness are more likely to smoke, putting them at risk for smoking-related cancer, lung disease, and cardiovascular disease.

Source: American Psychological Association; Kirsten Weir ; Home // Monitor on Psychology // June 2013 Monitor on Psychology // Smoking and mental illness
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Every cigarette a man smokes takes 11 minutes off his life. That means every pack of cigarettes Big Tobacco makes shortens a man's life by 3.5 hours. Let that blow your mind.

Source: Shaw, Mary, Richard Mitchell, and Danny Dorling. "Time for a smoke? One cigarette is equivalent to 11 minutes of life expectancy." British Medical Journal. 320(53). 2000. Web.
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In the U.S. alone, every day the tobacco industry spends enough money marketing its products to buy 150,000 10-karat gold grillz.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2007 and 2008." Federal Trade Commission. 2011. Report.
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In 2011, tobacco killed nearly 6 million people worldwide.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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In the U.S., 113,100 people die from smoking-related pulmonary diseases each year (pneumonia, influenza, emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airways obstruction).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Ammonia is in tobacco smoke. It's also used to clean toilets.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 178.
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Nearly 70% of smokers say they want to quit, but only 6% are able to each year.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults- United States, 2000." CDC, 26 July 2002. 51(29): 642-645. Web.
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E-cigarettes have had some quality-control issues. Plus, most e-cigs contain addictive nicotine, and carcinogens have been found in some e-cig vapor. How about we get some more research and regulation up in here?

Source: Cobb, Nathan K., et al. "Novel Nicotine Delivery Systems and Public Health: The Rise of the “E-Cigarette"." American Journal of Public Health. 100(12). Dec. 2010: 2340–2342. Web.
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There are 11 known human carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. Oct. 2001.
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