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Big Tobacco spends nearly $1 million every hour marketing their products at the "point of sale" — a.k.a. where people buy things (like the counter at a drugstore). 

Source: Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2012. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2015. http://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2012/150327-2012cigaretterpt.pdf. Accessed November 16, 2015.
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1,685,068 pounds of toxic chemicals were released by tobacco product manufacturing facilities in the US in 2012. There goes the neighborhood!

Source: "TRI 312229: Other Tobacco Product Manufacturing Facilities (NAICS 312229)." A Center for Effective Government. Washington, DC. 2011. Web.
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620 people die each year in the U.S. from smoking-related fires.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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A recent study showed that low-income neighborhoods are more likely to have tobacco retailers near schools than other neighborhoods. 

Source: Heather D’Angelo, PhD, Alice Ammerman, DrPH, RD, Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, Laura Linnan, ScD, Leslie Lytle, PhD, and Kurt M. Ribisl, PhD. Sociodemographic Disparities in Proximity of Schools to Tobacco Outlets and Fast-Food Restaurants. AJPH ; September 2016, Vol 106, No. 9
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The tobacco industry spends $9.6 billion a year on the marketing of its products in the U.S. alone.

Source: "FTC Releases Reports on 2012 Cigarette and Smokeless Tobacco Sales and Marketing Expenditures." FTC. 2015. Report.
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In 1985, one tobacco company brainstormed targeting potential smokers in school bathrooms, playgrounds, YMCAs, and city parks.

Source: "XG BRAINSTORMING. NYC, 2126." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 26 Feb. 1985. Report.
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Ammonia is in tobacco smoke. It's also used to clean toilets.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 178.
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Of current smokers in the U.S., 2,633,000 have chronic bronchitis from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 52(35). 05 Sept. 2003: 842-844. Table.
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In the U.S., 160,000 people die each year from smoking-related lung cancer.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
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Tobacco products are the only legal consumer product that can kill people when used as intended.

Source: "Tobacco Free Initiative (TFI). WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008 - The MPOWER package." World Health Organization. 2009: 15. Web.
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During 2005-2009, smoking-attributable productivity losses totaled $150.7 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Nicotine has been found in the breast milk of animals exposed to tobacco.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 564. Report.
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