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Each year only 6.2% of smokers succeed in quitting.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." CDC. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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Cigarette companies advertised "light" cigarettes as less harmful to the smoker, although they can deliver the same levels of tar and nicotine.

Source: National Cancer Institute. "Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine." Bethesda, MD: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001. 21, 245-246.
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Big tobacco has glamorized smoking in ads featured in LGBTQ magazines.

Source: SMITH EA, OFFEN N, MALONE RE. Pictures Worth a Thousand Words: Noncommercial Tobacco Content in the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Press. Journal of health communication. 2006;11(7):635-649. doi:10.1080/10810730600934492.
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69 animal and/or human carcinogens are in tobacco smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001.
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Tobacco companies' products kill about 40,000 people every month. That's more lives thrown away than there are public garbage cans in NYC.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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The tobacco industry spends $9.6 billion a year on the marketing of its products in the U.S. alone.

Source: "FTC Releases Reports on 2012 Cigarette and Smokeless Tobacco Sales and Marketing Expenditures." FTC. 2015. Report.
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Chemicals that seep out of cigarette butts can be acutely toxic to fish and micro-organisms.

Source: Micevska, T., et al. "Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 50(2). Feb. 2006: 205-12. Web.
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Because of the tobacco industry's products, about 353 people in the U.S. die of lung cancer every day.

Source: "Tobacco Use. Targeting The Nations Leading Killer: At A Glance 2010." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Atlanta, GA: 2. Web.
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During Desert Storm, Big Tobacco sent voice-recorded holiday cards to deployed soldiers. Their rationale? “Awareness and visibility of Marlboro among young adult smokers.” Happy holidays?

Source: Smith, E. A., & Malone, R. E. (2009). Tobacco Promotion to Military Personnel: “The Plums Are Here to Be Plucked.” Military Medicine, 174(8), 797–806.
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Big Tobacco once proposed a brand targeting younger smokers, called Kestrel. A kestrel is a bird that preys on small rodents.

Source: George-Perutz, Andrew. "Project Screen (Kestrel, Heron, Nightingale)." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 20 Jan. 1989. Letter.
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82.4% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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