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Ammonia is in tobacco smoke. It's also used to clean toilets.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 178.
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Benzene is in tobacco smoke. Benzene causes cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 176.
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In cities like DC, there are up to 10 times more tobacco ads in black neighborhoods than other neighborhoods.

Source: American Journal of Public Health : Peer Reviewed. "Marketing Little Cigars and Cigarillos: Advertising, Price, and Associations With Neighborhood Demographics" ; Jennifer Cantrell, DrPH, MPA, Jennifer M. Kreslake, MPH, Ollie Ganz, MSPH, Jennifer L. Pearson, PhD, MPH, Donna Vallone, PhD, MPH, Andrew Anesetti-Rothermel, MPH, Haijun Xiao, MS, and Thomas R. Kirchner, PhD ; October 2013, Vol 103, No. 10
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Sunburns can cause wrinkles; so can cigarettes.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Mar. 2001. Health Consequences of Tobacco Use Among Women. Web.
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Using smokeless tobacco is also associated with gum recession, dental caries, and dental staining and abrasion.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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Those glowing amber charcoals used on hookahs? They release high levels of dangerous toxic agents like carbon monoxide, metals and cancer-causing chemicals.

Source: Cobb, Caroline, et al."Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: An Emerging Health Crisis in the United States." American Journal of Health Behavior. 34(3). May-June 2010: 275–285. Web.
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Radioactive Polonium-210 is found in cigarette smoke. Polonium-210 contributes to cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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People with serious mental illness are more likely to smoke, putting them at risk for smoking-related cancer, lung disease, and cardiovascular disease.

Source: American Psychological Association; Kirsten Weir ; Home // Monitor on Psychology // June 2013 Monitor on Psychology // Smoking and mental illness
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Smokeless tobacco increases the risk of oral cancer.

Source: "Summaries and Evaluations Tobacco Products, Smokeless (Group 1)." International Agency for Research on Cancer. 10 Feb. 1998. Web.
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Chronic exposure to heavy metals like lead, arsenic and cadmium can affect the brain. They're all found in cigarette smoke.

Source: Tchounwou, Paul B, et al."Heavy Metals Toxicity and the Environment." PMC. 26 Aug. 2014.
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In the US, 540,000 people die a tobacco-related death every year.

Source: "Smoking and Mortality — Beyond Established Causes." NEJM. Brian D. Carter, M.P.H., Christian C. Abnet, Ph.D., Diane Feskanich, Sc.D., Neal D. Freedman, Ph.D., Patricia Hartge, Sc.D., Cora E. Lewis, M.D., Judith K. Ockene, Ph.D., Ross L. Prentice, Ph.D., Frank E. Speizer, M.D., Michael J. Thun, M.D., and Eric J. Jacobs, Ph.D., 12 Feb. 2015.
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