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LGBTQ young adults are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco.

Source: "This Free Life Campaign." FDA. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 2 May 2016.
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Smokeless tobacco is addictive.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Using Smokeless Tobacco: A Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, NIH Pub. Bethesda, MD. Apr. 1986. Report.
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In 1984, a tobacco company called younger adult smokers "replacement smokers."

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids. 14 May 2001: 2.
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In a file from 1978, Big Tobacco described cancer as "an essential ingredient of life." Wait, they're talking about cancer, right?

Source: "A Public Relations Strategy for the Tobacco Advisory Council Appraisal & Proposals Prepared by Campbell-Johnson Ltd." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 20 Nov. 1978. Report.
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In the past, Big Tobacco has compared the addictiveness of cigarettes with M&M's.

Source: "The State of Minnesota By Hubert H. Humphrey, III, Its Attorney General, vs. Philip Morris Incorporated. Deposition of Calude E. Teague, Jr. With Exhibits 1088-1100 Plus Exhibit A." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 08 Jul. 1997. Deposition.
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Big Tobacco targeted people in the U.S. military.

Source: Tobacco Promotion to Military Personnel: “The Plums Are Here to Be Plucked.”
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In 1981, one tobacco company document said, "Hispanic men still strive to project a macho image."

Source: "Salem Black Initiative Program Brand Team Ideation Session." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 03 Aug. 1989. Report.
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Big Tobacco once proposed a brand targeting younger smokers, called Kestrel. A kestrel is a bird that preys on small rodents.

Source: George-Perutz, Andrew. "Project Screen (Kestrel, Heron, Nightingale)." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 20 Jan. 1989. Letter.
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Between 2009-2012, the estimated annual smoking-attributable economic costs in the U.S. were between $289-332.5 billion.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Adolescents who use smokeless tobacco are more likely to become cigarette smokers.

Source: "Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People: A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevetion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 17. Web.
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Cadmium is found in cigarettes. Cadmium is also found in batteries.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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