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Cigarette smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cancer, 2014: 9. Report.
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There is no level or amount of exposure to secondhand smoke that is “risk-free.”

Source: “Smokefree Policies Improve Health.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 Dec. 2016,
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,154,000 have a cancer other than lung cancer from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003: 52(35) 842-844. Web.
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About 90% of lung cancer deaths among women who continue to smoke are tobacco related.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2001. 13. Report.
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Big Tobacco paid retailers a combined $294 million in 2014 to sell and display tobacco products in their stores. 

Source: 1. U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Cigarette Report for 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2016 Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-tradecommission- cigarette-report-2014-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco-report/ftc_cigarette_report_2014.pdf; 2. FTC, Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2016, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2014-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco-report/ftc_smokeless_tobacco_report_2014.pdf [Data for top 5 manufacturers only]. http://tobaccofreewny.com/app/uploads/2015/09 /Influencing-Youth-at-Point-of-Sale-Facts-Sheet.pdf
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy increases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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A study showed that 11-14 year olds who visited convenience stores at least twice a week were more than twice as likely to begin smoking as those who rarely visited those stores. 

Source: Lisa Henriksen, Nina Schleicher, Ellen Feighery, and Stephen Fortmann, A Longitudinal Study of Exposure to Retail Cigarette Advertising and Smoking Initiation, 126 PEDIATRICS 232, 232 (2010);
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620 people die each year in the U.S. from smoking-related fires.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Since 1964, there have been more than 20 million premature deaths attributed to tobacco in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General Executive Summary." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Each year, nearly 6 million people around the world die from tobacco products.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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Every year, 27 million pounds of pesticides are used to grow tobacco.

Source: "Fact Sheet: Environmental Impact of Tobacco." Multnomah County Health Department. March 2013. Web.
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