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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,742,000 have emphysema from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003. 52(35): 842-844. Table.
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82.4% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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620 people die each year in the U.S. from smoking-related fires.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Tobacco products are the only legal consumer product that can kill people when used as intended.

Source: "Tobacco Free Initiative (TFI). WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008 - The MPOWER package." World Health Organization. 2009: 15. Web.
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Big Tobacco companies give price discounts, place ads inside and outside of convenience stores, and even offer incentives for retailers to encourage them to keep selling their products

Source: ChangeLabSolutions: Point of Sale Playbook: POLICY OPTIONS TO REGULATE THE SALE AND MARKETING OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, 2016. http://www.changelabsolutions.org/sites/default/ files/Point_of_Sale_Playbook_FINAL_20160105.pdf
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In the US, cigarettes kill about 54 people an hour.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy increases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Cigarettes and other smoking materials are the number one cause of fire deaths in the U.S.

Source: Hall, John R. "The Smoking Material Fire Problem." National Fire Protection Association. July 2013. Web.
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Benzene is in tobacco smoke. Benzene causes cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 176.
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In the U.S., smoking results in 5.4 million years of potential life lost each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Respiratory Diseases. 2004. 43, 47. Report.
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Tobacco companies' products kill about 40,000 people every month. That's more lives thrown away than there are public garbage cans in NYC.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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