Make it stop

Showing 105 Results

600 MILLION TREES are chopped down every year for Big Tobacco.

Source: "Tobacco and the environment." Action on Smoking and Health. Sept. 2015. Web.
421
Reactions

In the US, cigarettes kill about 54 people an hour.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
191
Reactions

82.4% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
920
Reactions

Cigarettes are the most Littered Item On Earth.

Source: "Top 10 Items Found." Ocean Conservancy. Web.
571
Reactions

One half of all lifetime smokers will die prematurely as a result of smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. 2004. 873. Report.
94
Reactions

For approximately 50 years, tobacco companies falsely and fraudulently denied that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and Nationals African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Intervenors, and Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 1-4, 219, 259, 293, 330, 479, 655, 819, 1397. Document.
78
Reactions

Cigarette smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cancer, 2014: 9. Report.
321
Reactions

Over 99% of convenience stores in the U.S. sell cigarettes. 99.6% sell other tobacco products. And 92% have tobacco ads on display. That's a lot of 9's to say: convenience stores sure seem to be crazy about cigarettes. 

Source: 1. Cigarettes Generate Big Revenue for Convenience Stores: Analysis of 2013 State of the Industry Report. The Center for Tobacco Policy & Organizing http://center4tobaccopolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Cigarettes-Generate-Big-Revenue-September-2013.pdf 2. Feighery, E. C., Ribisl, K. M., Schleicher, N. C., & Clark, P. I. (2004). Retailer participation in cigarette company incentive programs is related to increased levels of cigarette advertising and cheaper cigarette prices in stores. Prev Med, 38(6), 876-884.
32
Reactions

Every year, 27 million pounds of pesticides are used to grow tobacco.

Source: "Fact Sheet: Environmental Impact of Tobacco." Multnomah County Health Department. March 2013. Web.
126
Reactions

Chemicals that seep out of cigarette butts can be acutely toxic to fish and micro-organisms.

Source: Micevska, T., et al. "Variation in, and Causes of, Toxicity of Cigarette Butts to a Cladoceran and Microtox." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 50(2). Feb. 2006: 205-12. Web.
396
Reactions

In the U.S., 113,100 people die from smoking-related pulmonary diseases each year (pneumonia, influenza, emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airways obstruction).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
62
Reactions