Youth

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Between 2010 and 2016, smoking was depicted in 34% of youth rated movies, and 71% of R-rated movies.

Source: Tynan MA, Polansky JR, Titus K, Atayeva R, Glantz SA. Tobacco Use in Top-Grossing Movies — United States, 2010–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 7 Jul 2017;66:681–686.
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As long ago as 1969, a tobacco company executive stated that they had "taken a great many steps to avoid advertising directed to young people." Yet 10 years later, they supplied their products to be featured in The Muppet Movie.

Source: Legacy Tobacco Documents Library. American Tobacco Collection. July 22, 1969. Page: 82 of 197 in PDF. Document Type: Congressional Testimony, Legal Bates Number: 968062385/2581
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In 1989, one tobacco company called the threat of an acute deficiency of young adult smokers the "doomsday scenario."

Source: FCB/LKP Marketing Planning Department. "Winston 1990+." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 18 Dec. 1989. Document.
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1 out of 3 smokers begin smoking before the age of 14.

Source: Mowery PD, et al. "Legacy First Look Report 3 Pathways to Established smoking: Results from the 1999 National Youth Tobacco Survey." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. Oct. 2000. Report.
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There is more smoking in TV shows rated TV-PG than in TV shows with a TV-14 rating. In other words, smoking is more prevalent on shows that aim to reach younger viewers. Hmm.

Source: Cullen, Jennifer, et al. "Depictions of Tobacco Use in 2007 Broadcast Television Programming Popular Among US Youth." Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. 165(2). 07 Feb. 2011: 147-151. Web.
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A recent study showed that low-income neighborhoods are more likely to have tobacco retailers near schools than other neighborhoods. 

Source: Heather D’Angelo, PhD, Alice Ammerman, DrPH, RD, Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, Laura Linnan, ScD, Leslie Lytle, PhD, and Kurt M. Ribisl, PhD. Sociodemographic Disparities in Proximity of Schools to Tobacco Outlets and Fast-Food Restaurants. AJPH ; September 2016, Vol 106, No. 9
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Big Tobacco once proposed a brand targeting younger smokers, called Kestrel. A kestrel is a bird that preys on small rodents.

Source: George-Perutz, Andrew. "Project Screen (Kestrel, Heron, Nightingale)." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 20 Jan. 1989. Letter.
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The more 10-14 year olds in the U.S. see smoking in movies, the more likely they are to start smoking.

Source: "Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General Executive Summary." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 2012.
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy results in the deaths of 1,015 infants every year in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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About one third of youth smokers will eventually die from a tobacco-related disease.

Source: Epstein, D. "Tobacco: the next World War?" Pan American Health Organization. World Health Organization. 1997. 2(2). Web.
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1981: "Today's teenager is tomorrow's potential regular customer." Said a tobacco researcher whose company was definitely not targeting kids.

Source: "PM USA Research Center - Young Smokers Prevalence, Trends, Implications and Related Demographic Trends." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 31 Mar. 1981. Report.
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