Youth

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Less than 6% of teens still smoke. That's less than the number of landlines still in use.

Source: Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Miech, R. A., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2015). Monitoring the Future national results on drug use: 1975-2015: Overview, Key Findings on Adolescent Drug Use. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research, The University of Michigan.
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Some kids exposed to secondhand smoke have more body fat and slower learning skills.

Source: "Second-hand Smoke Increases Fatness, Hinders Cognition in Children." Medical Xpress. 28 Jan. 2016.
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About one third of youth smokers will eventually die from a tobacco-related disease.

Source: Epstein, D. "Tobacco: the next World War?" Pan American Health Organization. World Health Organization. 1997. 2(2). Web.
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From 1965-2009, there have been 103,355 tobacco-related infant deaths in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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In 1974, a tobacco company explored targeting customers as young as 14.

Source: "RJR Domestic Operating Goals and Assumptions." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 21 Nov. 1974. Document.
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How do infants avoid secondhand smoke? "At some point they begin to crawl." –Tobacco Executive, 1996.

Source: "Trial testimony of MICHAEL WAYNE OGDEN, Ph.D., March 17, 2005, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. PHILIP MORRIS USA INC." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 17 March 2005: 89.
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In 1985, one tobacco company brainstormed targeting potential smokers in school bathrooms, playgrounds, YMCAs, and city parks.

Source: "XG BRAINSTORMING. NYC, 2126." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 26 Feb. 1985. Report.
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy increases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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1981: "Today's teenager is tomorrow's potential regular customer." Said a tobacco researcher whose company was definitely not targeting kids.

Source: "PM USA Research Center - Young Smokers Prevalence, Trends, Implications and Related Demographic Trends." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 31 Mar. 1981. Report.
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Every day, more than 3,200 youth under age 18 try a cigarette for the first time.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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In 2005, the vast majority of secondary school students who used smokeless tobacco were male.

Source: Eaton, D., et al. "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance --- United States, 2005." CDC. 09 June 2006. 55: 1-108. Table 26.
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