Youth

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In 1974, a tobacco company explored targeting customers as young as 14.

Source: "RJR Domestic Operating Goals and Assumptions." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 21 Nov. 1974. Document.
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In 1985, one tobacco company brainstormed the idea of reaching younger adult customers in record stores.

Source: "XG BRAINSTORMING NYC, 2/26." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 26 Feb. 1985. Report.
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Teens who see tobacco use in movies have more positive attitudes towards smoking.

Source: "The Role of the Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use. Tobacco Control Monograph No. 19." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. June 2008.
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34.1% of middle school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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1981: "Today's teenager is tomorrow's potential regular customer." Said a tobacco researcher whose company was definitely not targeting kids.

Source: "PM USA Research Center - Young Smokers Prevalence, Trends, Implications and Related Demographic Trends." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 31 Mar. 1981. Report.
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Tobacco companies actually went to court to fight for the right to keep tobacco advertising near high schools. They won. Congrats, Big Tobacco!

Source: "Lorillard Tobacco Co., et al., Petitioners v. Thomas F. Reilly, Attorney General of Massachusetts; Altadis U.S.A. Inc., et al., Petitioners v. Thomas F. Reilly, Attorney General of Massachuetts." Supreme Court of the United States. 00-596, 00-597. 2000. Court Brief.
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In 1972, a tobacco company considered adding honey to cigarettes because teenagers like sweet products.

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Washington, DC. 14 May 2001. 3. Web.
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In 1989, one tobacco company called the threat of an acute deficiency of young adult smokers the "doomsday scenario."

Source: FCB/LKP Marketing Planning Department. "Winston 1990+." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 18 Dec. 1989. Document.
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In 2007, Camel sold pink and teal-packaged cigarettes which attracted young girls.

Source: Pierce, JP, et al. "Camel No. 9 cigarette-marketing campaign targeted young teenage girls." Pediatrics. Apr. 2010. 125(4): 619-26. Web.
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In 1984, a tobacco company called younger adult smokers "replacement smokers."

Source: "Tobacco Company Quotes on Marketing to Kids." Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids. 14 May 2001: 2.
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Every day, more than 3,200 youth under age 18 try a cigarette for the first time.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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