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Big Tobacco's products affect the readiness and performance of the military.

Source: Combating Tobacco Use in Military and Veteran Populations, 2009
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In the past, Big Tobacco sponsored research in an attempt to show the “positive aspects of smoking.”

Source: RJR,SMITH CJ. PREPARATION OF A SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN ARTICLE IN HOW NICOTINE WORKS IN THE HUMAN BRAIN.. 1993 April 09. RJ Reynolds Records..
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In 1996, the tobacco industry said that drinking one to two glasses of whole milk a day was riskier than second-hand smoke.

Source: "Second-Hand Tobacco Smoke in Perspective. What Risks Do You Take?" Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 1994. Advertisement.
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Those glowing amber charcoals used on hookahs? They release high levels of dangerous toxic agents like carbon monoxide, metals and cancer-causing chemicals.

Source: Cobb, Caroline, et al."Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: An Emerging Health Crisis in the United States." American Journal of Health Behavior. 34(3). May-June 2010: 275–285. Web.
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Urea was found in cigarettes. Urea is also found in Pee.

Source: Covington & Burling. "Summary of Data on Urea." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 05 Feb. 1993. Report.
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Quitting smoking has been linked to helping with symptoms of depression.

Source: Lembke, Anna, Kenasha Johnson, and Charles DeBattista. “Depression and Smoking Cessation: Does the Evidence Support Psychiatric Practice?” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 3.4 (2007): 487–493. Print.
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In 2009, annual smoking-attributable healthcare expenditures were estimated at $132.5 billion.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Benzene, arsenic and cyanide are all poisons. They're all in cigarette smoke too.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, Oct. 2001.
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Arsenic is in tobacco smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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