Women

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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy increases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Smoking is responsible for the premature deaths of approximately 3 million women since 1980.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. 30 Aug. 2002. 51: 1-30. Web.
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About 90% of lung cancer deaths among women who continue to smoke are tobacco related.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2001. 13. Report.
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It is estimated that as many of 7.2% of women who gave birth, smoked during pregnancy.

Source: "Drake P, Driscoll AK, Mathews TJ. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy: United States, 2016. NCHS Data Brief, no 305. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2018."
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In 1971, when one tobacco executive was reminded that smoking can lead to underweight babies, he said, "Some women would prefer smaller babies."

Source: Centers for Disease Control, Surgeon General. "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General- 2001." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 2001.
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Every day, tobacco-related disease kills about 553 women in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Every year, tobacco-related disease kills about 202,000 women in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Tobacco companies have been targeting women with their advertising for the last 80 years.

Source: "Women and Smoking: Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. Factors Influencing Tobacco Use Among Women, 2001. 44, 96. Report.
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Pregnant women who smoke increase their risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and SIDS.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 3-86. Report.
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