Truth by numbers

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The number of tobacco farms in the U.S. has gone from 415,315 in 1959 to 10,014 today.

Source: "Tobacco-Farms and Acres, by Acres Harvested, Quantity Harvested, and Value of Crop for Tobacco, for Selected States: 1964 and 1959." U.S. Department of Agriculture. Table 59.
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About one third of youth smokers will eventually die from a tobacco-related disease.

Source: Epstein, D. "Tobacco: the next World War?" Pan American Health Organization. World Health Organization. 1997. 2(2). Web.
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Cigarette companies increased its spending on advertisements and promotions from 8.05 billion in 2010 to 8.37 billion in 2011.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2011." Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission. 2013. Report.
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Big Tobacco's products kill 1,300 smokers every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In 2008, more than 48 million Americans had successfully quit smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults and Trends in Smoking Cessation- United States, 2008." CDC. 13 Nov. 2009: 58(44).
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For approximately 50 years, tobacco companies falsely and fraudulently denied that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and Nationals African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Intervenors, and Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 1-4, 219, 259, 293, 330, 479, 655, 819, 1397. Document.
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About 20% of African American youth are exposed to secondhand smoke in the home.

Source: American Legacy Foundation. Secondhand Smoke--Youth Exposure and Adult Attitudes--Results from Three National Surveys. Supplemental Tables. Table S-5. Prevalence of Secondhand Smoke Exposure (Ages 12-17) -1999-2003 LMTS.
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1 out of 3 smokers begin smoking before the age of 14.

Source: Mowery PD, et al. "Legacy First Look Report 3 Pathways to Established smoking: Results from the 1999 National Youth Tobacco Survey." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. Oct. 2000. Report.
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Every year, 439,000 loyal tobacco customers in the U.S. are awarded with premature death.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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Nearly 70% of smokers say they want to quit, but only 6% are able to each year.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults- United States, 2000." CDC, 26 July 2002. 51(29): 642-645. Web.
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