TobaccoTargets

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1981: "Today's teenager is tomorrow's potential regular customer." Said a tobacco researcher whose company was definitely not targeting kids.

Source: "PM USA Research Center - Young Smokers Prevalence, Trends, Implications and Related Demographic Trends." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 31 Mar. 1981. Report.
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African Americans are more likely to die from smoking-related diseases than white Americans.

Source: African Americans and Tobacco Use: Smoking & Tobacco Use ; Center for Disease Control and Prevention ; August 17, 2016
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In an effort to market to African Americans in the 80s, one tobacco company said their brand "must be seen as authentic" and "not as a big white company's tactic to sell to blacks."

Source: "Salem Black Initiative Program Brand Team Ideation Session." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 03 Aug. 1989. Report.
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A major tobacco company visited a Pride festival to hand out coupons for cigarettes priced at $1 per pack. That’s five cents a smoke.

Source: "Newport's Pleasure Lounge Aims to Ignite Cigarette Sales." The Wall Street Journal; 13 Sept 2016.
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In 2007, Camel sold pink and teal packaged cigarettes which attracted young girls.

Source: "Camel No. 9 Cigarette-Marketing Campaign Targeted Young Teenage Girls." American Academy of Pediatrics, 10 November 2009
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As late as 1999, tobacco companies placed in-store advertising signage at a child's eye level.

Source: "Point-of-Purchase Tobacco Environments and Variation by Store Type --- United States, 1999." CDC. 08 March 2002. 51(09): 184-7. Web.
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In the US, 540,000 people die a tobacco-related death every year.

Source: "Smoking and Mortality — Beyond Established Causes." NEJM. Brian D. Carter, M.P.H., Christian C. Abnet, Ph.D., Diane Feskanich, Sc.D., Neal D. Freedman, Ph.D., Patricia Hartge, Sc.D., Cora E. Lewis, M.D., Judith K. Ockene, Ph.D., Ross L. Prentice, Ph.D., Frank E. Speizer, M.D., Michael J. Thun, M.D., and Eric J. Jacobs, Ph.D., 12 Feb. 2015.
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In the 50’s, Big Tobacco went into low-income neighborhoods and housing projects to hand out free cigarettes. Some went to children as young as 9 years old.

Source: WILLIE EVANS v. LORILLARD TOBACCO COMPANY. Superior Court of Massachusetts, County. WILLIE EVANS, as Executor of the Estate of Marie R. Evans, Plaintiff v. LORILLARD TOBACCO COMPANY, Defendant ; CIVIL ACTION NO: 2004–2840–B ; September 01, 2011
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Big Tobacco disproportionately targeted the LGBTQ community. They even used “pride” in their advertisements. 

Source: "How the Tobacco Industry Has Targeted the LGBT Community for Decades." ATTN.com; 13 Jan 2017.
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39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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