TobaccoFacts

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In the U.S., smoking results in 5.4 million years of potential life lost each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Respiratory Diseases. 2004. 43, 47. Report.
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Smoking is responsible for the premature deaths of approximately 3 million women since 1980.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. 30 Aug. 2002. 51: 1-30. Web.
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600 MILLION TREES are chopped down every year for Big Tobacco.

Source: "Tobacco and the environment." Action on Smoking and Health. Sept. 2015. Web.
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Nearly 70% of smokers say they want to quit, but only 6% are able to each year.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults- United States, 2000." CDC, 26 July 2002. 51(29): 642-645. Web.
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Tobacco accounts for one out of every ten deaths worldwide and claims nearly 6 million lives each year.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 6 July 2015. Web.
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,742,000 have emphysema from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003. 52(35): 842-844. Table.
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Every year, 27 million pounds of pesticides are used to grow tobacco.

Source: "Fact Sheet: Environmental Impact of Tobacco." Multnomah County Health Department. March 2013. Web.
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Every cigarette a man smokes takes 11 minutes off his life. That means every pack of cigarettes Big Tobacco makes shortens a man's life by 3.5 hours. Let that blow your mind.

Source: Shaw, Mary, Richard Mitchell, and Danny Dorling. "Time for a smoke? One cigarette is equivalent to 11 minutes of life expectancy." British Medical Journal. 320(53). 2000. Web.
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From 1965-2009, there have been 103,355 tobacco-related infant deaths in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Report.
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The majority of smokers begin before the age of 18 (nearly 87% before age 18, and nearly 94% before age 20).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Less than 6% of teens still smoke. That's less than the number of landlines still in use.

Source: Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Miech, R. A., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2015). Monitoring the Future national results on drug use: 1975-2015: Overview, Key Findings on Adolescent Drug Use. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research, The University of Michigan.
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39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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