TobaccoFacts

Showing 112 Results

There are 11 known human carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. Oct. 2001.
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In the U.S., 7,330 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related lung cancer.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Tobacco accounts for one out of every ten deaths worldwide and claims nearly 6 million lives each year.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 6 July 2015. Web.
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The majority of smokers begin before the age of 18 (nearly 87% before age 18, and nearly 94% before age 20).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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For approximately 50 years, tobacco companies falsely and fraudulently denied that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and Nationals African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Intervenors, and Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 1-4, 219, 259, 293, 330, 479, 655, 819, 1397. Document.
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39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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600 MILLION TREES are chopped down every year for Big Tobacco.

Source: "Tobacco and the environment." Action on Smoking and Health. Sept. 2015. Web.
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In the U.S., 60.9% of students who ever smoked cigarettes daily tried to quit smoking cigarettes

Source: "High School Students Who Tried to Quit Smoking Cigarettes --- United States, 2007." CDC. Atlanta, GA. 58(16). 01 May 2009: 428-431. Web.
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,154,000 have a cancer other than lung cancer from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003: 52(35) 842-844. Web.
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In the US, cigarettes kill about 54 people an hour.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Big Tobacco's products kill 1,300 smokers every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the U.S., 113,100 people die from smoking-related pulmonary diseases each year (pneumonia, influenza, emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airways obstruction).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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