TobaccoFacts

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In 1995, 43% of teens in West Virginia smoked. Today, only 16.2% of teens in West Virginia smoke. Damn, West Virginia teens are killing it at living.

Source: West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources. Addressing Tobacco Use and Its Associated Health Conditions in West Virginia. Charleston, WV: West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources, Bureau for Public Health, West Virginia Division for Tobacco Prevention, Office of Community Health Services and Health Promotion, 2016.
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Of current smokers in the U.S., 384,000 have had a stroke from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Attributable Morbidity - United States, 2000." CDC. 52(35). 2003: 842-844. Table.
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Back in 2003, there was only one lonely smoke-free college campus. Now there are 2,342 smoke-free campuses!

Source: American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation (ANRF). Smokefree and Tobacco-free U.S. and Tribal Colleges and Univeristies. Retrieved from http://no-smoke.org/wp-content/uploads/pdf/smokefreecollegesuniversities.pdf
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More than 10 million cigarettes per minute were smoked around the world every single day in 2016.

Source: The Tobacco Atlas. Consumption. https://tobaccoatlas.org/topic/consumption/. (**Internal calculation - cigs smoked/min daily for 2016 is 10.8M : 5.7 trillion smoked in 2016, 5.7 trillion/365/24/60 = 10.8M per minute)
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82.4% of lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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About 20% of African American youth are exposed to secondhand smoke in the home.

Source: American Legacy Foundation. Secondhand Smoke--Youth Exposure and Adult Attitudes--Results from Three National Surveys. Supplemental Tables. Table S-5. Prevalence of Secondhand Smoke Exposure (Ages 12-17) -1999-2003 LMTS.
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In the US, 160,600 people die from smoking-related cardiovascular and metabolic diseases each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Over 16 million Americans live with tobacco-related illnesses.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Every day, tobacco-related disease kills about 553 women in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the U.S., 7,330 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related lung cancer.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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620 people die each year in the U.S. from smoking-related fires.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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