TobaccoFacts

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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy results in the deaths of 1,015 infants every year in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Back in 2003, there was only one lonely smoke-free college campus. Now, there are 1,475!

Source: "Smokefree and Tobacco-Free Colleges and Universities." Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights. Berkeley, CA. Web.
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One half of all lifetime smokers will die prematurely as a result of smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. 2004. 873. Report.
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The number of tobacco farms in the U.S. has gone from 415,315 in 1959 to 10,014 today.

Source: "Tobacco-Farms and Acres, by Acres Harvested, Quantity Harvested, and Value of Crop for Tobacco, for Selected States: 1964 and 1959." U.S. Department of Agriculture. Table 59.
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Tobacco companies' products kill about 40,000 people every month. That's more lives thrown away than there are public garbage cans in NYC.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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The five major smokeless manufacturers spent a total of $451.7 million on advertising and promotion in 2011, an increase from the $444.2 million spent in 2010.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2011." Federal Trade Commission. May 2013: 1. Report.
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Nearly 70% of smokers say they want to quit, but only 6% are able to each year.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults- United States, 2000." CDC, 26 July 2002. 51(29): 642-645. Web.
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It is estimated that as many as 15.9% of pregnant women and girls smoke.

Source: "Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings." Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Sept. 2013. 47. Figure 4.5.
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,742,000 have emphysema from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003. 52(35): 842-844. Table.
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69 animal and/or human carcinogens are in tobacco smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001.
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