TobaccoDeath

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Big Tobacco's products kill 112 people from secondhand smoke every day.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Every day, tobacco-related disease kills about 553 women in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the U.S., smoking results in 5.4 million years of potential life lost each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Respiratory Diseases. 2004. 43, 47. Report.
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One half of all lifetime smokers will die prematurely as a result of smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. 2004. 873. Report.
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy results in the deaths of 1,015 infants every year in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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About 90% of lung cancer deaths among women who continue to smoke are tobacco related.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2001. 13. Report.
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In the US, 160,600 people die from smoking-related cardiovascular and metabolic diseases each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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African Americans are more likely to die from smoking-related diseases than white Americans.

Source: African Americans and Tobacco Use: Smoking & Tobacco Use ; Center for Disease Control and Prevention ; August 17, 2016
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620 people die each year in the U.S. from smoking-related fires.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Each year, nearly 6 million people around the world die from tobacco products.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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Smoking is responsible for the premature deaths of approximately 3 million women since 1980.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. 30 Aug. 2002. 51: 1-30. Web.
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