TobaccoDeath

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In the U.S., 33,951 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related heart disease.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Tobacco companies' products kill about 40,000 people every month. That's more lives thrown away than there are public garbage cans in NYC.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. Surgeon General's Report." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Tobacco kills about 30 times more people than murder.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Secondhand smoke causes more than 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults every single year.

Source: “Get the Facts.” Smoke-Free ATL - Everyone in ATL Has the Right to Breathe Smoke-Free Air. 2018.
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Every day, tobacco-related disease kills about 553 women in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the U.S., 7,330 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related lung cancer.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Of current smokers in the U.S., 2,633,000 have chronic bronchitis from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 52(35). 05 Sept. 2003: 842-844. Table.
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Every 6 seconds, someone in the world dies from a smoking-related disease.

Source: "Tobacco Fact sheet N°339." World Health Organization. 06 July 2015. Web.
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In the US, cigarettes kill about 54 people an hour.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the U.S., 160,000 people die each year from smoking-related lung cancer.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure to secondhand smoke in infancy results in the deaths of 1,015 infants every year in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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