Quitting

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Studies show that people seeking treatment for nicotine dependence alongside substance abuse are more likely to be successful.

Source: Baca & Yahne, 2008; Prochaska et al., Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2004.
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Quitting smoking has been linked to helping with symptoms of depression.

Source: Lembke, Anna, Kenasha Johnson, and Charles DeBattista. “Depression and Smoking Cessation: Does the Evidence Support Psychiatric Practice?” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 3.4 (2007): 487–493. Print.
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In 2008, more than 48 million Americans had successfully quit smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults and Trends in Smoking Cessation- United States, 2008." CDC. 13 Nov. 2009: 58(44).
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Each year only 6.2% of smokers succeed in quitting.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." CDC. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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In 2012, adults whose highest level of academic achievement was high school had the lowest rates of successfully quitting smoking in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Nearly 70% of smokers say they want to quit, but only 6% are able to each year.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults- United States, 2000." CDC, 26 July 2002. 51(29): 642-645. Web.
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In 2010, 52.4% of U.S. smokers quit for at least a day.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." CDC. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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African Americans are less likely to successfully quit smoking than white Americans.

Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR): Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010 ; Center for Disease Control and Prevention ; November 11, 2011
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In the U.S. in 2010, 62.4% of current young adult smokers were able to quit smoking for more than a day.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." CDC. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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In the U.S. in 2012, 73.9% of people with at least a college degree who had ever smoked reported that they had successfully quit.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In 2010, 75.6% of African Americans were interested in quitting smoking and 59.1% reported making a quit attempt.

Source: "Quitting Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2001--2010." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 11 Nov. 2011. 60(44): 1513-1519. Web.
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