Facts

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The five major smokeless manufacturers spent a total of $451.7 million on advertising and promotion in 2011, an increase from the $444.2 million spent in 2010.

Source: "Federal Trade Commission Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2011." Federal Trade Commission. May 2013: 1. Report.
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Less than 6% of teens still smoke. That's less than the number of landlines still in use.

Source: Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Miech, R. A., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2015). Monitoring the Future national results on drug use: 1975-2015: Overview, Key Findings on Adolescent Drug Use. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research, The University of Michigan.
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One tree is killed for just 15 packs of Cigarettes.

Source: "Billions of trees. Millions of cigarette butts. One dangerous product." California Department of Public Health. 2015. Web.
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39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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Smoking is responsible for the premature deaths of approximately 3 million women since 1980.

Source: "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General." CDC. 30 Aug. 2002. 51: 1-30. Web.
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Because of the tobacco industry's products, about 353 people in the U.S. die of lung cancer every day.

Source: "Tobacco Use. Targeting The Nations Leading Killer: At A Glance 2010." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Atlanta, GA: 2. Web.
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In the US, smoking-attributable productivity losses for men are approximately $105.6 billion per year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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There are 11 known human carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. Oct. 2001.
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Every day, tobacco-related disease kills about 553 women in the US.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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The majority of smokers begin before the age of 18 (nearly 87% before age 18, and nearly 94% before age 20).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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For approximately 50 years, tobacco companies falsely and fraudulently denied that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and Nationals African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Intervenors, and Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 1-4, 219, 259, 293, 330, 479, 655, 819, 1397. Document.
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In the U.S., 113,100 people die from smoking-related pulmonary diseases each year (pneumonia, influenza, emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airways obstruction).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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