Disease

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In the U.S., 33,951 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related heart disease.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the US, 36,000 people die each year from cancers other than lung caused by smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the US, 160,600 people die from smoking-related cardiovascular and metabolic diseases each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Over 16 million Americans live with tobacco-related illnesses.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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In the U.S., 113,100 people die from smoking-related pulmonary diseases each year (pneumonia, influenza, emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airways obstruction).

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Smoking can lead to cataracts, the number one cause of vision loss in the world.

Source: "Surgeon General's Report. The Health Conquences of Smoking." CDC. Other Effects. 777, 779. Web.
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For approximately 50 years, tobacco companies falsely and fraudulently denied that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and Nationals African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Intervenors, and Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 1-4, 219, 259, 293, 330, 479, 655, 819, 1397. Document.
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In the U.S., about 41,000 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related diseases.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cardiovascular Diseases. 2014. Report.
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Long-term smokeless tobacco users may be up to fifty times more likely to have cancers of the cheek and gum than non-users.

Source: "Cancer Facts & Figures 2015." American Cancer Society. Atlanta, GA. 2015: 48. Web.
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Smokeless tobacco use causes oral cancer, lesions, and gum recession.

Source: Nelson, D.E., et al. "Trends in Smokeless Tobacco Use Among Adults and Adolescents in the United States." American Journal of Public Health. 96(5). May 2006: 897–905.
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Pregnant women who smoke increase their risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and SIDS.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 3-86. Report.
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Of former smokers in the U.S., 1,755,000 have had a heart attack from smoking.

Source: "Cigarette Smoking-Attributable Morbidity --- United States, 2000." CDC. 05 Sept. 2003. 52(35): 842-844. Table.
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