Disease

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For approximately 50 years, tobacco companies falsely and fraudulently denied that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and Nationals African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Intervenors, and Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 1-4, 219, 259, 293, 330, 479, 655, 819, 1397. Document.
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People with serious mental illness are more likely to smoke, putting them at risk for smoking-related cancer, lung disease, and cardiovascular disease.

Source: American Psychological Association; Kirsten Weir ; Home // Monitor on Psychology // June 2013 Monitor on Psychology // Smoking and mental illness
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Smoking can lead to cataracts, the number one cause of vision loss in the world.

Source: "Surgeon General's Report. The Health Conquences of Smoking." CDC. Other Effects. 777, 779. Web.
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In the US, 130,659 people die each year from smoking-related lung cancer.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In the US, 160,600 people die from smoking-related cardiovascular and metabolic diseases each year.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Over 16 million Americans live with tobacco-related illnesses.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs. 2014. Report.
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Radioactive Polonium-210 is found in cigarette smoke. Polonium-210 contributes to cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 180.
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In the U.S., about 42,000 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related diseases.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Cardiovascular Diseases. 2014. Report.
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Since 1964, there have been more than 20 million premature deaths attributed to tobacco in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General Executive Summary." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Using smokeless tobacco is also associated with gum recession, dental caries, and dental staining and abrasion.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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Benzene is in tobacco smoke. Benzene causes cancer.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 176.
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