Disease

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Of former smokers in the U.S., 637,000 have had a stroke from smoking.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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Smokeless tobacco use causes oral cancer, lesions, and gum recession.

Source: Nelson, D.E., et al. "Trends in Smokeless Tobacco Use Among Adults and Adolescents in the United States." American Journal of Public Health. 96(5). May 2006: 897–905.
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Hookah smoke has been associated with oral, lung and bladder cancer, not to mention clogged arteries and heart disease.

Source: Cobb, Caroline, et al."Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking: An Emerging Health Crisis in the United States." American Journal of Health Behavior. 34(3). May-June 2010: 275–285. Web.
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In the U.S., 7,330 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related lung cancer.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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In 1971, when one tobacco executive was reminded that smoking can lead to underweight babies, he said, "Some women would prefer smaller babies."

Source: Centers for Disease Control, Surgeon General. "Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General- 2001." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, 2001.
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Since 1964, there have been more than 20 million premature deaths attributed to tobacco in the U.S.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General Executive Summary." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Report.
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Even if someone doesn't consider themselves a smoker, every "bummed" cigarette causes damage to vital organs in the body. Give that pancreas a break.

Source: Young, Saundra. "Surgeon General report: Tobacco smoke does immediate damage." CNN. 09 Dec. 2010. Web.
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Smoking can lead to cataracts, the number one cause of vision loss in the world.

Source: "Surgeon General's Report. The Health Conquences of Smoking." CDC. Other Effects. 777, 779. Web.
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Pregnant women who smoke increase their risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and SIDS.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking." CDC. Reproductive Effects. 3-86. Report.
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In the U.S., 33,951 people die each year from secondhand smoke-related heart disease.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs, 2014. Report.
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The most common causes of death among people with mental illness are heart disease, cancer, and lung disease, which can all be caused by smoking.

Source: Tobacco Use Among Adults with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders (Secondary Source CDC Report)
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