Advertising

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In 2014, Big Tobacco spent $7.12 billion discounting products at the "point of sale" — a.k.a. where people buy things (like the counter at a drugstore)

Source: 1. U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Cigarette Report for 2014, 2016, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-tradecommission- cigarette-report-2014-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco-report/ftc_cigarette_report_2014.pdf; 2. FTC, Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2014, 2016, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2014-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco-report/ftc_smokeless_tobacco_report_2014.pdf
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In 2007, Camel sold pink and teal packaged cigarettes which attracted young girls.

Source: "Camel No. 9 Cigarette-Marketing Campaign Targeted Young Teenage Girls." American Academy of Pediatrics, 10 November 2009
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Big Tobacco companies give price discounts, place ads inside and outside of convenience stores, and even offer incentives for retailers to encourage them to keep selling their products

Source: ChangeLabSolutions: Point of Sale Playbook: POLICY OPTIONS TO REGULATE THE SALE AND MARKETING OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, 2016. http://www.changelabsolutions.org/sites/default/ files/Point_of_Sale_Playbook_FINAL_20160105.pdf
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Back in the day, tobacco companies provided the White House with complimentary gold-sealed "Presidential" cigarettes. Way to hail the chief.

Source: Bull, Stephen B. "Presidential Cigarettes." Truth Tobacco Industry Documents. 13 Apr. 1988. Memo.
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In DC, Big Tobacco advertises up to 10x more in black neighborhoods than in other neighborhoods

Source: Lee, J. G., Henriksen, L., Rose, S. W., Moreland-Russell, S., & Ribisl, K. M. (2015). A systematic review of neighborhood disparities in point-of-sale tobacco marketing. American journal of public health, 105(9), e8-e18.
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Big Tobacco spends nearly $1 million every hour marketing their products at the "point of sale" — a.k.a. where people buy things (like the counter at a drugstore). 

Source: Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2012. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2015. http://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2012/150327-2012cigaretterpt.pdf. Accessed November 16, 2015.
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Advertising products at the point-of-sale at convenience stores increases "impulse buys" and makes tobacco seem like a part of everyday life. Which is probably why Big Tobacco spends 95% of its $9.1 billion yearly budget here. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape. St. Louis, MO: Center for Public Health Systems Science at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Cancer Institute, State and Community Tobacco Control Research Initative, 2014. http://publichealthlawcenter.org/sites/default /files/resources/WaU-guide-POS-policy-report-2015.pdf
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Advertising and promotional expenditures for both cigarettes and smokeless tobacco in 2017: $9.4 billion.

Source: Federal Trade Commission. Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2017. Retrieved from https://www.ftc.gov/reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2017-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco. Published February, 2019.
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Over 99% of convenience stores in the U.S. sell cigarettes. And 70% of teens visit a convenience store at least once a week. Convenient, indeed. 

Source: U.S. DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, OFFICE OF THE SURGEON GENERAL, PREVENTING TOBACCO USE AMONG YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS: A REPORT OF THE SURGEON GENERAL 12 (2012) http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/ sgr/2012/consumer_booklet/pdfs/consumer.pdf
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Yep. When people see the celebs that they love smoking, they start thinking smoking is a normal, aspirational thing. Says who? Says science. Lots and lots of science.

Source: "The Role of the Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use. Tobacco Control Monograph No. 19." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. June 2008.
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Low-income neighborhoods are more likely to have tobacco retailers near schools than other neighborhoods

Source: D’Angelo, Heather, Alice Ammerman, Penny Gordon-Larsen, Laura Linnan, Leslie Lytle, and Kurt M. Ribisl. "Sociodemographic Disparities in Proximity of Schools to Tobacco Outlets and Fast-Food Restaurants." American Journal of Public Health 106.9 (2016): 1556-562.
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