Advertising

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Advertising products at the point-of-sale at convenience stores increases "impulse buys" and makes tobacco seem like a part of everyday life. Which is probably why Big Tobacco spends 95% of its $9.1 billion yearly budget here. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape. St. Louis, MO: Center for Public Health Systems Science at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Cancer Institute, State and Community Tobacco Control Research Initative, 2014. http://publichealthlawcenter.org/sites/default /files/resources/WaU-guide-POS-policy-report-2015.pdf
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In DC, Big Tobacco advertises up to 10x more in black neighborhoods than in other neighborhoods

Source: Lee, J. G., Henriksen, L., Rose, S. W., Moreland-Russell, S., & Ribisl, K. M. (2015). A systematic review of neighborhood disparities in point-of-sale tobacco marketing. American journal of public health, 105(9), e8-e18.
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Yep. When people see the celebs that they love smoking, they start thinking smoking is a normal, aspirational thing. Says who? Says science. Lots and lots of science.

Source: "The Role of the Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use. Tobacco Control Monograph No. 19." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. June 2008.
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A study showed that 11-14 year olds who visited convenience stores at least twice a week were more than twice as likely to begin smoking as those who rarely visited those stores. 

Source: Lisa Henriksen, Nina Schleicher, Ellen Feighery, and Stephen Fortmann, A Longitudinal Study of Exposure to Retail Cigarette Advertising and Smoking Initiation, 126 PEDIATRICS 232, 232 (2010);
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Big Tobacco paid retailers a combined $294 million in 2014 to sell and display tobacco products in their stores. 

Source: 1. U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Cigarette Report for 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2016 Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-tradecommission- cigarette-report-2014-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco-report/ftc_cigarette_report_2014.pdf; 2. FTC, Smokeless Tobacco Report for 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2016, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2014-federal-trade-commission-smokeless-tobacco-report/ftc_smokeless_tobacco_report_2014.pdf [Data for top 5 manufacturers only]. http://tobaccofreewny.com/app/uploads/2015/09 /Influencing-Youth-at-Point-of-Sale-Facts-Sheet.pdf
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Exposure to pro-tobacco movies, TV shows, and ads more than doubles your chances of starting smoking.

Source: Wellman, Robert J., et al. "The Extent to Which Tobacco Marketing and Tobacco Use in Films Contribute to Children's Use of Tobacco: A Meta-analysis." Archive of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Jan. 2007.
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34.1% of middle school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.

Source: "Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle School and High School Students-- United States, 2004." CDC. 01 Apr. 2005: 54(12) 297-301. Web.
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Big Tobacco spends nearly $1 million every hour marketing their products at the "point of sale" -- a.k.a. where people buy things (like the counter at a drugstore). 

Source: Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission Cigarette Report for 2012. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2015. http://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents /reports/federal-trade-commission-cigarette-report-2012/150327-2012cigaretterpt.pdf. Accessed November 16, 2015.
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In 2007, Camel sold pink and teal packaged cigarettes which attracted young girls.

Source: "Camel No. 9 Cigarette-Marketing Campaign Targeted Young Teenage Girls." American Academy of Pediatrics, 10 November 2009
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Around 375,000 stores in the U.S. sell tobacco products. 

Source: Center for Public Health Systems Science. Point-of-Sale Report to the Nation: The Tobacco Retail and Policy Landscape, 2014.
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Big Tobacco companies give price discounts, place ads inside and outside of convenience stores, and even offer incentives for retailers to encourage them to keep selling their products

Source: ChangeLabSolutions: Point of Sale Playbook: POLICY OPTIONS TO REGULATE THE SALE AND MARKETING OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, 2016. http://www.changelabsolutions.org/sites/default/ files/Point_of_Sale_Playbook_FINAL_20160105.pdf
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Studies show that there is a positive connection between tobacco promotions and the people who see them's susceptibility to smoking. 

Source: Paynter J, Edwards R. The impact of tobacco promotion at the point of sale: a systematic review. Nicotine Tob Res. 2009;11:25–35.
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