Addiction

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On their websites, tobacco companies encourage people to quit smoking. However, in 2006, a court found that tobacco companies manipulate nicotine levels to keep smokers addicted.

Source: "United States of America, Plaintiff, and Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, and National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Ontervenors, v. Philip Morris USA, Inc. (f/k/a Philip Morris, Inc.), et al., Defendants." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 17 Aug. 2006: 5.
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Studies show that people seeking treatment for nicotine dependence alongside substance abuse are more likely to be successful.

Source: Baca & Yahne, 2008; Prochaska et al., Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2004.
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A tobacco executive said that smoking is only as addictive as "sugar and salt and internet access."

Source: Freiberg, M. "The Verdict Is In: Findings from United States v. Philip Morris." Tobacco Control Legal Consortium, 2006: 3.
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Nicotine reaches the brain 10-20 seconds after smoke is inhaled.

Source: "The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Nicotine, 2014. Report.
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Adolescents who use smokeless tobacco are more likely to become cigarette smokers.

Source: "Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People: A Report of the Surgeon General." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevetion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 17. Web.
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Cigarette companies advertised "light" cigarettes as less harmful to the smoker, although they can deliver the same levels of tar and nicotine.

Source: National Cancer Institute. "Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine." Bethesda, MD: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001. 21, 245-246.
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Ammonia boosts the impact of nicotine.

Source: "Smoking and Tobacco Control." U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. 19 Nov. 2001: 174.
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Big Tobacco has been ordered to say they were deliberately deceptive when they designed cigarettes to jack up the impact of nicotine.

Source: "United States of America v. Phillip Morris USA, Inc." United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 27 Nov. 2012. Document.
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E-cigarettes are smoke-free and tobacco-free, but not all are nicotine-free even though some claim to be.

Source: "The Truth About: Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems." Truth Initiative.
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People recovering from substance abuse are twice as likely to relapse within three years if they are a smoker.

Source: Weinberger, Andrea H., et al. “Cigarette Smoking Is Associated With Increased Risk of Substance Use Disorder Relapse: A Nationally Representative, Prospective Longitudinal Investigation.” The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc., 22 Feb. 2017.
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Because nicotine from smokeless tobacco is absorbed through the mouth, it takes longer to produce an effect than if it were absorbed through the lungs. But using cigarettes and smokeless tobacco really do result in the same amount of nicotine intake.

Source: "Youth and Tobacco: Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General." Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. 33. Web.
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